I and decision making in its simplest form.

I have always been interested in learning about the “Why” questions, related to nature, existence, and decision
making in its simplest form. When I was in the 8th grade, my English teacher introduced my class to the idea of
Presentism, the idea that nothing beyond right now exists. I was mind-blown and wanted to know more about
philosophical theories, so I took on a “Why me?” project with my teacher. A couple of other students and I
explored questions and theories about our existence and the nature of knowledge. We eventually presented our
“findings” to 6th and 7th-grade classes in our school. At the beginning of my junior year, I took a History of
Education course at Brooklyn College. I got the chance to learn about the works of John Locke, Aristotle, Plato,
and more while dissecting their educational and political philosophies. This class deepened my understanding of
my place in the world, and while I was able to answer many of my own questions, I also developed a lot more,
which I hope to find the answers to over the course of my life.
When I do attend college, I would be interested in joining a philosophy club while discussing different matters with
like-minded students. Cornell’s Sage School of Philosophy is renowned for its success in teaching students the
fundamental principles of philosophy and their real-world applications. In addition to Philosophy, I’ve always been
interested in learning about quantum physics, and its theoretical concepts. The inner Sci-fi lover in me has always
enjoyed hearing about parallel universes, alternate realities/dimensions, and time travel. However, I want to learn
more theories as well. It has already been proven by physicists such as Max Planck that there are other laws at
work in the universe, operating on deeper levels than the ones we know. Cornell offers a variety of quantum
physics/mechanics courses including Physics of the Heavens and the Earth, which combines both of my interests
in philosophy and physics. Humans never stop learning, and this is why we have been able to make so many
advancements over the past few centuries. I want to learn as much as I can about the world, and I believe that
Cornell’s unique curriculum will allow for me to explore much of my of interests. Philosophy and quantum physics
are two contrasting subjects, and some may even regard them to have no correlation; however, the link between
quantum physics and philosophy can be found in metaphysics or explored in other fields. I have always been
passionate about English and Philosophy, but I would love to explore my scientific interests as well. In order for
anyone to contribute positively to the world around them, they must be given access to the resources necessary
for them to learn, grow, and succeed in any field that they wish to pursue, and Cornell excels at this.